Water Rhapsody

Suppliers and installers of
Grey Water
and
Rainwater Harvesting systems in South Africa with experience since 1994 and over 3000 installations.

Biofuel from algae grown in wastewater

Posted by: Saving Water SA (Cape Town, South Africa) – partnered with Water Rhapsody conservation systems – 17 February 2011

Let algae do the dirty work. Researchers at Rochester Institute of Technology are developing biodiesel from microalgae grown in wastewater. The project is doubly “green” because algae consume nitrates and phosphates and reduce bacteria and toxins in the water. The end result: clean wastewater and stock for a promising biofuel.

Cold weather is an issue for biodiesel fuels.

The purified wastewater can be channeled back into receiving bodies of water at treatment plants, while the biodiesel can fuel buses, construction vehicles and farm equipment. Algae could replace diesel’s telltale black puffs of exhaust with cleaner emissions low in the sulfur and particulates that accompany fossil fuels.

Algae have a lot of advantages. They are cheaper and faster to grow than corn, which requires nutrient-rich soil, fertilizer and insecticide. Factor in the fuel used to harvest and transport corn and ethanol starts to look complicated.

In contrast, algae are much simpler organisms. They use photosynthesis to convert sunlight into energy. They need only water—ponds or tanks to grow in—sunlight and carbon dioxide.

“Algae—as a renewable feedstock—grow a lot quicker than crops of corn or soybeans,” says Eric Lannan, who is working on his master’s degree in mechanical engineering at RIT. “We can start a new batch of algae about every seven days. It’s a more continuous source that could offset 50 percent of our total gas use for equipment that uses diesel.” Continue reading Biofuel from algae grown in wastewater

Go green with a grey water solution

Posted by: Saving Water SA (Cape Town, South Africa) – partnered with Water Rhapsody conservation systems – 27 December 2010

Only a minute share of water in our planet (2.5%) is potable, and most is locked up as ice while only one per cent is available in lakes, rivers and underground water tables for […]

Vaal water not suitable by 2014

Posted by: Saving Water SA (Cape Town, South Africa) – partnered with Water Rhapsody conservation systems – 23 December 2010

A water time-bomb is ticking for millions of users of water from the Vaal River – by 2014, it will not be suitable for human consumption.

Water from the Lesotho Highlands to dilute Vaal pollution will not be enough by 2014

Researchers said the problem was caused by acidic water seeping from waste on abandoned mines and by the discharging of untreated acidic mine water into rivers and streams tributary to the Vaal River system.

A report released by the Department of Water Affairs revealed that, by 2014, the water drawn from the Lesotho Highlands water scheme to dilute the high level of pollution in the Vaal will not be enough.

“The increase in dissolved salts and [other pollutants], such as chloride and sulphates, in the river has major implications for domestic, industrial and agricultural water use,” the report said.

According to the department, the Vaal River system serves a population of 12million in Gauteng, the Free State, North West and Northern Cape.

But water scientist Anthony Turton said the pollution does not mean an abrupt end to the supply of water. “It means the water supply to municipalities, industries and agriculture can no longer be guaranteed,” he said. “Strategic industries, such as Sasol and Eskom, will suffer. Economic activity will slow dramatically.”

The research report said the cost of water will increase dramatically. Continue reading Vaal water not suitable by 2014

Phosphate in Washing Powder destroy Water Eco Systems

Posted by: Saving Water SA (Cape Town, South Africa) – partnered with Water Rhapsody conservation systems – 29 July 2010

Phosphate is a nutrient that is essential for plant growth and is found naturally in the environment. But the excess use of phosphates by humans is overloading our water bodies, which can lead to […]

Lake Victoria turning green with algae blooms

Posted by: Saving Water SA (Cape Town, South Africa) – partnered with Water Rhapsody conservation systems – 22 March 2010

Pollution in parts of Lake Victoria is worsening so fast that soon it may be impossible to treat its waters enough to provide drinking water for the Ugandan capital, a senior official said on Monday.

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